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  • Mirror with Paris, Helen and the Dioscuri Castor and Pollux. Etruscan H2162 - Thorvaldsensmuseum
    in conversation with the Dioscuri Castor and Polydeukes lat Pollux In the background an architectural structure possibly the gable of a temple is suggested The Dioscuri were brothers and as the name suggests sons of Zeus the Greek Dios is the genitive of Zeus while kouros means young man But in fact Zeus was the father only of Polydeukes who was therefore immortal Castor who was the son of Tyndareus was on the other hand mortal The two brothers were inseparable and when Castor was mortally wounded in battle Polydeukes begged his father for help So Zeus let the two brothers in turn live for one day on earth and for one day in the realm of the dead The Dioscuri were a popular motif with the Etruscans They are often represented on mirrors as unbearded young men dressed in short cloaks and carrying spear and shield They are often also wearing Phrygian caps known as piloi Mirrors were typically articles for use in the upper strata of the Etruscan society They were often made of bronze but in rare cases also of silver Many of the Etruscan mirrors like this one have a decoration engraved on the reverse Unfortunately

    Original URL path: http://www.thorvaldsensmuseum.dk/en/collections/work/H2162 (2015-09-25)
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  • Mirror with Achilles, Thetis, Athena, and Automedon. Etruscan H2170 - Thorvaldsensmuseum
    Thorvaldsen Collection at Nysø Google Art Project CC0 Luk Mirror with Achilles Thetis Athena and Automedon Etruscan c 300 BC Bronze 14 8 cm diameter Inventory number H2170 Enlarge photo Download A scene from Homer s Iliad decorates this mirror The sea nymph Thetis is giving her son Achilles his new weapons made by the divine smith Hephaestus On the left stands the goddess Athena on the right Automedon Achilles charioteer There is a temple façade in the background Athena may be the Olympian deity who has most frequently been identified on Etruscan mirrors This is explained by her easily recognisable attributes helmet spear aegis a shield or breastplate adorned with the Gorgon Medusa s head and owl Many of the Etruscan mirrors have figure decorations engraved on the reverse These are often of everyday happenings such as dressing scenes with young men and women bathing dressing and smartening themselves up The most popular motifs however were scenes from Greek mythology as in the present instance The mythological figures on the mirrors can often be identified via inscriptions in Etruscan or Latin These inscriptions on mirrors are at the same time an important source for our knowledge of Etruscan literature

    Original URL path: http://www.thorvaldsensmuseum.dk/en/collections/work/H2170 (2015-09-25)
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  • Kohl-tube. Egyptian, New Kingdom H256 - Thorvaldsensmuseum
    Archives Crosscuts Thorvaldsen s works worldwide The Thorvaldsen Collection at Nysø Google Art Project CC0 Luk Kohl tube Egyptian New Kingdom 1550 BC 1069 BC Wood with traces of paint H 6 5 cm Total H 9 5 cm Inventory number H256 Enlarge photo Download This tube consists of two wooden cylinders with a stick in between that keeps the rotating lid in place when closed Remains of the kohl this tube was originally meant for can still be found in one of the cylinders Kohl is a black powder made from lead sulphides that was applied to the eyes with the thick end of a kohl stick soaked in water then dipped in the kohl itself Kohl worn by both men and women was the most important part of Egyptian make up that also included lipstick rouge and eye shadow The use of cosmetics in ancient Egypt served multiple purposes It was beautifying warded off eye infections and protected against the sun s rays Perhaps even more importantly it evoked the Eye of Horus that symbolised protection healing and finally resurrection which was the most fundamental part of Egyptian religion and their striving for eternal life Til top Opening

    Original URL path: http://www.thorvaldsensmuseum.dk/en/collections/work/H256 (2015-09-25)
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  • Bowl. Roman H2901 - Thorvaldsensmuseum
    cm diameter Inventory number H2901 Enlarge photo Download This glass bowl is in bluish green glass with a pattern in yellow lilac white and pale green This colourful glass bowl has acquired its delightful pattern by means of a special technique called mosaic glass or millefiori a thousand flowers as the finished result often emerges as a flower pattern Glass using this technique was made by slowly melting different coloured

    Original URL path: http://www.thorvaldsensmuseum.dk/en/collections/work/H2901 (2015-09-25)
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  • Statuette of a kneeling man with a stele. Egyptian, 18th Dynasty H354 - Thorvaldsensmuseum
    resting on his thigh On the stele an inscription can be seen expressing homage to the sun god Ra The reverse of the sculpture bears a formula telling of a sacrifice to the gods Amon Ra and Osiris During the 18th dynasty c 1550 1300 BC the stele bearer developed into a popular type of sculpture in Egypt By means of the inscription on the stele it was possible to

    Original URL path: http://www.thorvaldsensmuseum.dk/en/collections/work/H354 (2015-09-25)
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  • Shabti. Egyptian, 19th Dynasty H360 - Thorvaldsensmuseum
    Google Art Project Luk Shabti Egyptian 19th Dynasty 1295 BC 1186 BC Sandstone with paint 19 2 cm Inventory number H360 Enlarge photo Pi is the name of the man this shabti figure depicts With his folded arms he embraces a falcon He is wearing a wide sleeved tunic and a pleated skirt that reaches his ankles which is typical of the period He wears a wig and a false beard as well as disc shaped earrings and a bracelet that adorns his right wrist Traces of black blue and red paint can be found primarily on the wig eyes and hieroglyphics The latter partly runs vertically down the skirt and partly in four horizontal bands around the shabti The word shabti means answerer and in ancient Egyptian funerary tradition the figures served to work on Osiris fields in the afterlife on behalf of the deceased There could be hundreds of shabtis in a single grave which most commonly were mummy shaped holding agricultural tools The figures first appeared in the Middle Kingdom c 2130 1640 BC but truly gained a foothold in the New Kingdom c 1550 1070 BC The figures were included as part of the grave goods

    Original URL path: http://www.thorvaldsensmuseum.dk/en/collections/work/H360 (2015-09-25)
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  • Alabastron with a siren. Greek Corinthian H507 - Thorvaldsensmuseum
    Collections The Archives Crosscuts Thorvaldsen s works worldwide The Thorvaldsen Collection at Nysø Google Art Project Luk Alabastron with a siren Greek Corinthian c 600 BC Fired clay 22 5 cm Inventory number H507 Enlarge photo The drop shaped scent bottle a so called alabastron is decorated with a siren with her wings outstretched The fabulous beast which is a mixture of bird and woman came originally from Egypt However in the early Archaic period 6th century BC the siren along with several other Oriental figures was adopted into the Greek world of motifs The influence from the Near East can also be seen in the flower ornaments decorating the rest of the vase The pale clay indicates that the scent bottle stems from Corinth which in the 6th century BC and the beginning of the 5th century BC was a major producer of figure decorated ceramics The vase painter who decorated the scent bottle has not yet been identified However one vase in the Louvre in Paris one in the museum on the Greek island of Delos and one on the art market in New York were undoubtedly decorated by the same artist Til top Opening Hours Tuesday Sunday

    Original URL path: http://www.thorvaldsensmuseum.dk/en/collections/work/H507 (2015-09-25)
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  • Amphora with Dionysos between dancing sileni (A) and Herakles with the Erymanthian boar (B). Greek H538 - Thorvaldsensmuseum
    Project CC0 Luk Andókides Born before 530 BC Died after 500 BC Antímenesmaleren Born before 530 BC Died after 510 BC Amphora with Dionysos between dancing sileni A and Herakles with the Erymanthian boar B Greek c 520 BC Fired clay black figure technique 39 6 cm Inventory number H538 Enlarge photo Download The scene on the neck of the amphora shows the hero Herakles bringing the captured Erymanthian Boar to King Eurystheus Overcome by fear the king has hidden in a large container The motif refers to the third of the Twelve Labours that Herakles had to carry out as punishment for the fit of madness that made him slay his wife Megara and their children The scene on the other side of the neck of the vase renders the god of wine Dionysos with two sileni The vase was produced in Athens but was found in Italy close to the city of Viterbo It is decorated using the black figure technique The figure decoration is in this instance limited to the neck while the other surfaces are covered with black glaze Only few other examples of work decorated in this manner are known This vase was made by

    Original URL path: http://www.thorvaldsensmuseum.dk/en/collections/work/H538 (2015-09-25)
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